Elon Musk announces new Tesla technology to keep dogs safe

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Elon Musk’s Tesla cars will have a “dog mode” to protect pet pooches from overheating.

The billionaire entrepreneur announced that the new program would be rolled out to his fleet of Model 3 electric vehicles next week, The Sun reports.

It will be able to detect when a pet is locked inside the car — and keep the temperature at a safe level.

There will also likely be a display or some form of communication to inform passers-by that the dog is safe.

The new update comes after the tech guru was inundated with tweets from customers.

In October, one Tesla driver asked Mr Musk: “Can you put a dog mode on the Tesla Model 3.

“Where the music plays and the airconditioning is on, with a display on screen saying ‘I’m fine my owner will be right back’?”

The businessman replied: “Yes”.

Although it is as yet unclear how the new system will work, it will likely be an extension of Tesla’s Cabin Overheat Protection System.

This already prevents temperatures inside the car from reaching unsafe levels when kids or pets are inside.

But the screen in Tesla models is likely to now flash a message to pedestrians informing them that the pet inside is safe.

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The “dog mode” update will be launched at the same time as a “sentry mode” — designed to ward off would-be thieves.

On Wednesday, Mr Musk responded to a relative of a Tesla owner whose car window had been smashed.

The Twitter-user wrote: “Any update on sentry mode? Brother in law has his window broken into twice in the past two months.”

Mr Musk replied: “Sentry Mode (and Dog Mode) roll out next week.”

Sentry Mode will use the dashcam to record footage in the event of an attempted break-in.

And it is rumoured the car will play loud classical music through the stereo system to draw attention to the intruder — and hopefully scare them off.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and has been republished with permission.



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